The scandal of cheaper motoring. Yes, it HAS been getting cheaper.

RDRF has – almost alone of transport organisations – highlighted the decline in the cost of motoring . Compared to the costs of housing and other necessities, the costs of what conventional economists call “externalities”, the costs of more sustainable modes, the decline is persistent from 1980, then from the beginning of the Blair government and now through the current supposedly “austerity” one. While we have given rough estimates in the past, here are the official figures given by the Minister:Answering a question from Caroline Lucas MP on 30th June: ( Hansard Citation: HC Deb, 30 June 2014, c367W)

Robert Goodwill (Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport); Scarborough and Whitby, Conservative):
“The Department for Transport published statistics on travel costs based on data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) in the Transport Statistics Great Britain compendium.

Data from the independent ONS suggests that:

(i) Between 1980 and 2013 the real cost of motoring, including the purchase of a vehicle, declined by 12%, bus and coach fares increased by 59% and rail fares increased by 62% in real terms.

(ii) Between 1997 and 2013 the real cost of motoring, including the purchase of a vehicle, declined by 9%, bus and coach fares increased by 28% and rail fares increased by 22% in real terms.
(iii) Between 2010 and 2013 the real cost of motoring, including the purchase of a vehicle, decreased by 2%, bus and coach fares increased by 3% and rail fares increased by 5% in real terms.
((iv) The costs of travelling by air are not available from ONS data. However information is available based on fare data from the Civil Aviation Authority. The real cost of the average UK one-way air fare, including taxes and charges, covering domestic flights from 2000 to 2013 declined by 43% and from 2010 to 2013 declined by 3%. Estimates are not available on a comparable basis before 2000.”

(Our emphasis)

Apart from what we refer to in the introductory paragraph above, what about how:

• The costs of fuel (the fuel tax accelerator slashed by this Government without anything more than approval from the opposition) need to rise if revenue is not to be lost as more fuel efficient cars coming on stream (and it needs to increase to promote uptake of such vehicles).

• There is an urgent need to show how motorists do not pay their way compared to cyclists – necessary to counteract the “I Pay a Tax” bigots.

• Measures like land use planning and law enforcement – necessary though they are – will not be enough to reduce car dependency.
Who is raising such issues? Not the Government or “Opposition”. The Green party barely raises a peep: “if necessary work towards the introduction of road pricing schemes like the London congestion charge”. The issue is normally raised only in the context of public transport fare rises – although not the cost of cycling (few mention that the middle class dominance of the rise in cycling in London may be related to the cost of cycling). And cutting public transport fares has a lot less effect on reducing car use than many think.
So it is being raised here.

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