Category Archives: Costs of motoring

The scandal of cheaper motoring. Yes, it HAS been getting cheaper.

RDRF has – almost alone of transport organisations – highlighted the decline in the cost of motoring . Compared to the costs of housing and other necessities, the costs of what conventional economists call “externalities”, the costs of more sustainable modes, the decline is persistent from 1980, then from the beginning of the Blair government and now through the current supposedly “austerity” one. While we have given rough estimates in the past, here are the official figures given by the Minister: Continue reading

The Tour de France is welcomed to South Yorkshire – with this “road safety” rubbish

Although the image  below is a bit difficult to make out (the original is here), we reproduce it and take some time to examine its message as delivered by the “South Yorkshire Safer Roads Partnership” (SYSRP) . It is typical of why official “road safety” – as opposed to the real road safety of road danger reduction – is part of the problem of danger on the roads and discrimination against cycling and sustainable transport.

SouthYorkshire
Continue reading

The scandal of Osborne’s £22.5 billion giveaway to motorists

We have discussed this giveaway before, but it appears that we underestimated the extent of this additional subsidy to motoring. What makes it worse is the justification for this policy given by the Treasury (and HMRC) this week: Analysis of the dynamic effects of fuel duty reductions

This policy has been appalling for the prospects of sustainable transport in Britain. I list problems with  the report below: Continue reading

The silence over Osborne’s hand-out to motoring

Something didn’t happen in the wake of the Budget. There was practically no media response to the Chancellor’s continued refusal, yet again, to increase fuel tax duty. Below we put this in the context of continued discrimination against sustainable transport modes and support for a more car-based transport system, as well as showing how the costs of motoring stand in stark contrast to other expenditure. Continue reading